Finishing the Bus Converion Flooring

Time to finish the flooring.

School bus conversion floor

 

School bus conversion floor

 

Adding 1 x 2 furring strips

School bus conversion floor

 

Adding 1″ OSB subflooring

School bus conversion floor

 

Using Home Depots lot to finish the flooring.

School bus conversion floor

 

I put the flooring in place then marked the cut line from underneath.

School bus conversion floor

 

School bus conversion floor

The flooring is pretty straight forward. Now I can add the railing and trim.

School bus conversion floor

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Next Page: Staining and installing bus conversion trim

Finishing Bus Conversion Walls

I used 220 grit sandpaper and oil based, satin polyurethane to finish the bus conversion walls and kitchen counter. For simplicity, I will keep the focus of this post to one section of the bus. Same process applies for all the walls.

School bus conversion counter

The kitchen counter is a prebuilt unit but didn’t come with finished side panels. So I had to add some sanded 1/4″ lauan plywood. This is the same material I used for the bus conversion walls.

 

 

Finishing bus conversion kitchen countertop

Here is the lauan plywood cut and test fit.

 

 

Skoolie kitchen counter

Prebuilt counter after being hand sanded with 220 grit sand paper.

 

 

Boondocking work spot

Improvised work spot by the side of a river in Oregon.

 

 

sanding bus conversion panelling

Sanding the walls panels that aren’t already attached. The attached walls were also sanded with 220 sand paper.

 

 

skoolie wall panelling

After polyurethane is applied. The polyurethane was easier to apply on the unattached wall panels, less worry and monitoring for drips. I used a roller to apply the polyurethane then went back over the surface with a foam brush. I felt like this sped up the process.

 

 

polyurethane on bus conversion panelling

The polyurethane drying on the panels for the side of the kitchen counter.

 

 

Finishing kitchen counter

Clamping, wood gluing, and screwing the finished panels in place. I used trim screws instead of nails.

 

 

100_5439_opt

An example of how the finished walls turned out.

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Click here to see the last of the flooring being installed

 

 

 

 

 

Information that helped my freelancing journey

I’m only a few years into a freelance web design career. Freelancing originally allowed me to work from home and spend time with my bulldog as he gets older. Now, freelancing allows me to work from a T-mobile 4g hotspot. Working online made it a lot easier to do the van life routine while building the bus conversion. I still have a lot to learn and won’t be writing an exact how to guide just yet. You can figure out how to apply these podcast and books to your exact situation / skill set. There are links spread throughout the paragraphs below.

Work day at the beach

Work day at the beach

First, I happened to listen to a Tim Ferris interview on the Joe Rogan podcast. That led me to the Tim Ferris book The Four Hour Work Week. People get hung up on the title. Just try it. It will change the way you think and strategize about your next project. It’s a little outdated at this point but still applies. Tim Ferris also has a free podcast with a bunch of top notch guest. The Derek Sivers interview is probably my favorite. The Mike Rowe interview is also great and relates directly to freelancing.

The Four Hour Work Week motivated me to start consuming as many business related podcast as possible.  I came across Entrepreneur on Fire podcast (EOFire) while hunting for more Tim Ferris content. EOFire is 30-minute success stories with great information and lessons to motivate you. EOFire will probably lead you to other information that fits your exact learning style, skill set, etc.

Entrepreneur on Fire led me to The Side Hustle Show. Lot’s of great interviews with practical information that can be applied at all levels. The episodes about making a Fiverr.com business are what applied directly to my getting started in web design. You can sell all kinds of services on Fiverr. Writing, graphic design, logo design, voice over work, web design, web development, and even odd creative services all sell well on Fiverr. Spend some time learning one of these skills. Youtube has plenty of great educational videos and there are also premium sites that offer free trials, like Lynda.com

At this point, I was testing a small-scale agriculture project that involved raising quail. This testing was part of a homesteading plan. The bus conversion project is also part of that overall homesteading plan. I needed a Quail website, so I turned to youtube. Followed a step by step three hour tutorial and made my first WordPress website NolaQuail.com. Then I made a few other sites for practice.

I knew a few other small business owners that needed websites and local SEO work. It was pretty easy to get their business by being available in person and offering a solution to their delayed website plans. This Reddit.com AMA has some great info and strategies related to web design.

Improvised power station for working at the beach

Improvised power station for working at the beach

I also set up a Fiverr account based on the advice in this Side Hustle podcast. Fiverr made a good training ground for dealing with clients in a virtual setting. I still make regular Fiverr sales of over $100 and only take a few hours to complete. I rarely sell just $5 “gigs”. Upwork.com is a similar site that may help you acquire clients early on. I found that your client’s request will help guide you to the next most important thing to learn.

Feel free to ask questions and I’ll definitely respond.

Click here to start at the beginning of the school bus conversion project

 

 

Installing Trim in a Tiny House School Bus

Tiny House School Bus Trim Install

I chose trim screws over nails because of the bus moving and shifting. A lot of these pictures don’t require too many words. Feel free to ask questions in the comment section below and I will make sure to answer.

 

Tiny House School Bus Trim Install

 

 

Tiny House School Bus Trim Install

The window sill trim only had to be notched out around the emergency exits.

 

 

Tiny House School Bus Trim Install

Wheel cover

 

 

Tiny House School Bus Trim Install

Wheel cover

 

 

Tiny House School Bus Trim Install

Trim around the counter

 

 

Tiny House School Bus Trim Install

Start of the trim around the bathroom.

 

 

Tiny House School Bus Trim Install

Trim around bathroom. I cheated by using multiple 3″pieces of trim to complete the curve.

 

Tiny House School Bus Trim Install

Trim around bathroom. Click here to see all the trim pictures on one Pinterest board.

Want your own self-hosted WordPress blog like this one? Web design is how I pay for The Bus Experience. Feel free to call, text, or email me for help with making your website ideas a reality.

Next Page: Stair Railing Install